Keep the Focus on Your Profile

You have invested time on honing your LinkedIn Profile, getting it set up the right way and are being found in searches.

Imagine how frustrating it is when there are distractions that take your viewers away from your Profile and to other profiles instead! Possibly even your competitors.

LinkedIn have a feature that is turned on by default. It is called People Also Viewed (PAV). It sits in the right hand side of your Profile and lists profiles that other people have viewed. It is meant to be helpful however, as a business owner, you want the focus of your viewers to be on you, not to be distracted by moving away from your profile and especially to those who are your competitors.

What most LinkedIn Users don’t know is that this feature can be turned off so that it does not appear on your Profile.

How to turn off People Also Viewed

  1. Go to the Me button on the black menu bar at the top of your LinkedIn Profile
  2. Select the Accounts and Privacy Option
  3. Select the Privacy tab
  4. Select the Viewers of the profile also viewed option
  5. Select the Change button
  6. Click to move the slider from Yes to No

How to switch off PAV

Linda’s Interview with Charlotte Emery

I’m a member of The Athena Network in Farnham and the Regional Director, Charlotte Emery, recently interviewed me remotely during lockdown as part of her Business Showcase series.

In my Business Showcase interview, I tell Charlotte a little bit about my background, where I found my love of LinkedIn Training and why helping others to succeed is integral to all that I do. I also share some LinkedIn Tips!

Contact Charlotte for more information about The Athena Network

 

LinkedIn: You Don’t Know What You Don’t Know

How well do you know LinkedIn?

There are many levels of LinkedIn training you can undertake: some people just want to build connections and relationships, while others intend to use LinkedIn as a key part of their marketing strategy.

Whichever the case, there are essential skills that everyone needs to learn, such as how to update your profile. This may sound simple, but as one MD found out, mistakes can still happen – and are not best made in front of your entire professional network.

Here’s how the story goes…

As the managing director of an established IT company, Lisa had built up a sizeable LinkedIn network, including: colleagues, vendors, clients, business associates and leads. The business was booming: she was in the process of setting up a subsidiary company, while reassuring clients, associates and prospective clients that the existing business would remain her primary focus.

Excited for the launch of the new business, Lisa booked some LinkedIn training for her marketing team, so they could start raising awareness of the new venture. They would need to update their profiles to reflect both businesses, which was a core part of the initial LinkedIn training.

Creating a Professional Image

A paragraph of universal wording was agreed for the ‘Experience’ section of all personal profiles within the company, so a consistent message would be created regarding the developing business. Lisa attended the training along with her marketing team, but when it came to actually updating the profiles, she said she had ‘other things to do’ and ‘knew how to do this anyway’.

On went the training, and by the end of the session the marketing team felt confident in using LinkedIn to promote the business, the new Company Page had been created and they were proud of their smart new personal profiles! The trainer left, happy with the results and off to prepare for her next client.

Where’s the Panic Button?

Very early the following morning, the LinkedIn trainer had 3 missed calls with voicemails from Lisa to her mobile – all with an air of distress and urgency. It transpired that instead of adding her new business venture to her profile, Lisa had replaced any mention of her existing business with the new company – she had effectively shut down her own business overnight.

In amongst the many messages of surprise, and hesitant congratulations, Lisa received a number of private messages from her clients and prospects: demanding answers and raising concerns. Her calls and messages to the trainer were cries for help – she didn’t know what to do, or how to explain her rather public mistake.

Damage Limitation

What followed, were many hours (at a cost) spent rectifying the profile mistake and offering apologies and reassurance to her valuable clients and prospects. It was a simple error.  The remedy was to use the profile ‘Experience’ section to add the new business; then rearrange the order so the existing business would appear on top, as her primary focus.

Sharing profile edits swtichThis knowledge was built-in to the LinkedIn training schedule, just after Lisa left to attend to other things. So too, was the advice that when making any major changes to your profile you should ALWAYS switch off ‘Sharing profile edit’ – so you have the chance to review and move things around before your network are notified of the change.

To find this, go to Settings ➡️ Privacy ➡️ How others see your LinkedIn activity ➡️ Sharing profile edits ➡️ Switch to No

The Moral of the Story: You don’t know what you don’t know

If you are aware that training is needed, then book a trainer you trust to teach you and set aside the time to learn, even if you think you know it already. Like other platforms, LinkedIn regularly adds new features and updates existing ones, so a professional trainer will have the expertise to guide you through these.

Lisa is now happily running both businesses and has not lost any clients or prospects fortunately. However, following step-by-step instruction for something so important could have avoided unnecessary time and money spent, and removed the risk of damaging her business reputation.

 

💡 For more information on using LinkedIn to grow your business, or to book a targeted training session, please contact Linda for a no obligation conversation.

 

How to Align Your Personal LinkedIn Profile to your Company Page

One of the things I see frequently when helping people to use LinkedIn for Business is that they have set up a Company Page in LinkedIn but haven’t linked their Personal Professional Profile to it.

💡Here is how to do it – once your Company Page has been set up, it honestly takes a few seconds to link your Personal Professional Profile to it!

  1. In Your Personal Professional Profile, scroll down to your Experience section
  2. Make sure you have added your role in the business as an Experience – if you haven’t then you’ll need to Add an Experience – then follow from step 4 below
  3. Click the Edit button (the pencil button at the right) which opens the Editing window
  4. Click into the Company field
  5. Delete anything that is already in the Company field (even if it is the Company name)
  6. Type in the name of the Company Page (as this is what you are aligning to) – as you do so, you will see some different options appear.
  7. When your own Company Page is visible, click to select it and then Save

💡 Be careful not to select the wrong Company Page – I’ve seen several people select what looks like their Company Page as the name may be similar.

💡 When you set up your Company Page, I strongly advise you to add your logo to it, so that when you select the page in step 7 above, it will be easily identifiable.

Watch the short video to see the above steps demonstrated.


 

 

Make It Easy For People To Follow Your Company Page

One of the most common comments I hear when training people to use LinkedIn for business is that they are not attracting Followers on their Company Page. Usually it is because people fall into the trap of publishing their Company Page and then are not proactive in telling people it exists.

An easy way to do this is to add a Follow button to your website. LinkedIn provide a free Follow button plugin, which can be added to any page of your website.  You can either do this yourself or send the code to your web developer. You will need to be logged into LinkedIn to retrieve the code.

When the code is added and published on your website, this is what it will look like:


You can choose to show the number of followers horizontally, or choose not to show the number of followers at all. If you have less than 50 followers, this may be the better option. It shouldn’t be a numbers game however, we are naturally attracted to businesses who already have a positive presence, so if you are building your followers, leave the follower count out until you reach a number you are happy to publish.

To retrieve your own Follow button, go to the following link:

Add a Follow button

This is just one of the ways in which you can attract followers to your Company Page. If you would like to find out more about building a Follower Strategy for your Company Page, please Schedule a Call with Linda

Follow my Company Page

For more tips, advice, short ‘How To’ videos and LinkedIn news, please follow my Company Page – Linda Huckle Training.


Re-order Your Skills and Endorsements section

Pinning your top 3 Skills in LinkedIn

LinkedIn have made it a little bit easier to re-order your Skills and Endorsements section in your Personal Profile.

There is now the ‘Pin Skills to Top’ feature which enables you to pin your top 3 skills so they are prioritised over all your other skills, to encourage other LinkedIn users to endorse you for those top 3.

Here is how:

  • In your LinkedIn Profile, scroll down to your Skills and Endorsements section
  • Click or tap the pencil icon on the right to Edit
  • Once there, you’ll see your top 3 skills with the Pin button on the left in bold
  • To remove a skill from your top 3, just click or tap the Pin button. Don’t worry, you will not be deleting the skill, purely moving it out of the top 3
  • To add a skill to your top 3, scroll down the list of skills, identify which one you want to pin to the top and click/tap the Pin button on the left
  • Then click/tap the SAVE button

Watch this very short video to see the feature in action:

 

 

 

error

Enjoy this blog? Please spread the word :)